Sunday, February 01, 2009

When the Quiet That You Hear is the Jet Not Taking Off, the Cars Not Zooming Around, the Sound of Your Own Bed Quietly Calling

Home again. Though with my flight out of Toronto delayed for two hours (de-icing and mechanical stuff) for a while there, it felt like I’d never get home. (Though the complimentary alcoholic beverage the flight attendants bribed us with seemed to go a long way to stopping the grumbling.)

It was an exciting week away. It was funny, too because yesterday morning I reported from Toronto that Margaret Canon at the Toronto Globe and Mail had included a review of Death Was In the Picture in her twice monthly crime fiction column. And now here I am, reporting from Vancouver that the Vancouver Sun’s Rebecca Wigod included Death Was in the Picture among her picks for Best Reads for Spring. Does that mean that if I want either a New York or London Times review, I’m gonna need to get on some more planes?

Meanwhile, it’s the first today. That means it’s time for ITW’s monthly Big Thrill newsletter. This month, there are lots of super interesting author interviews, including Alex Berenson, William Lashner, Lincoln Child, Kate Carlisle, Robert Gregory Browne Linda Fairstein and a bunch others including yours truly. Cathy Clamp (Magic’s Design) did the interview. Here’s an excerpt:
What surprised you most when you were researching for this book?

The more research I did on the Motion Picture Production Code -- what people sometimes call The Hays Code -- the more passionate I got about this project. I kept thinking about how much the Production Code altered the history of American film. We really will never know -- and have no way of knowing -- what movies would have looked like had there not been such severe creative restrictions placed on the studios during the time the Production Code was in effect. Some people argue that the Code forced filmmakers to be more creative in order to get their stories told. And in some cases, that's probably true. However, it could also be argued that in some ways it completely subverted American culture.
The interview is here.

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